Intro to the A Bayamo family

We only have a handful of figures in the A Bayamo family. They are important because they break the circular clock-wise movement of most other moves, adding variation to your dance.

The moves in the A Bayamo family brings the Follow around the Lead in a motion sometimes called “rodeo”, “laso”, “around the clock”, “around the world”. A Bayamo figures are also popular because they have a stylish hand held Vacilala opening, a one handed Sombrero called a Sombrero Medio (half).

The A Bayamo moves are relatively new or have first been brought to the attention of a wider world audience recently. In the first wave of Cuban Salsa DVD courses coming out of Miami, “Salsa Racing”, “Salsa Lovers”, “Quick and Dirty Salsa”, there are no moves in the A Bayamo family.

A popular Cuban city

Bayamo is a city in Cuba. A Bayamo means “To Bayamo” or “Going to Bayamo”, and it sounds better with the “A” in front when called in a Rueda. But since we also like short figure names, the trend is to just call the moves Bayamo in writing.

Since Bayamo is a popular city, the city name pops up in several move names having nothing to do with the A Bayamo family of moves. On the “Salsa Racing” DVDs we have a move called Bayamo con Couche, and we have a move called Paseala por Bayamo. These two figures have nothing in common with the A Bayamo family of moves.

YouTube video confusion

There are surprisingly many bad A Bayamo videos out there. Many videos are poorly named, like calling the easy A Bayamo por Abajo for A Bayamo complicado (!), and A Bayamo por Arriba is sometimes called A Bayamo por Matanzas or just Mantanzas also being the name for a different version ending with a two handed Vacilala instead of a back-to-back turn.

A Bayamo

The basic A Bayamo comes in two main versions, a difficult and an easy. And we have three common variations of the Sombrero type of ending. I call the easy version for A Bayamo Fácil (easy).

A Bayamo por Abajo

Abajo (down) is part of many figure names, and it usually implies that the Lead at one point ducks under the Follow’s arm.

A Bayamo por Arriba

Arriba (up) alludes to the execution of the move. The Lead must keep both hands high as the Follow is lead behind his back. All the videos, I have found, with the Arriba name, end with a back-to-back turn also called a barrel turn.

Sometimes the move is called A Bayamo por Matanzas, another city in Cuba, or just Matanzas. It is confusing to have two city names for the same move. More than half of the time, when the move is named A Bayamo por Matanzas or Matanzas, the back-to-back ending is replaced with a two handed Vacilala.

I suggest that the name A Bayamao por Arriba is used for the back-to-back version, and that the two handed Vacilala version is called A Bayamo por Arriba con Vacilala.

A Bayamo por el Hueco

Go to Bayamo through the hole is a good descriptive name. The figur is sometimes called A Bayamo por dentro (inside) but el Hueco is better. Dentro is confusing, because it is also used for inside turn as opposed to fuera, outside turn.

A Bayamo a la matriz

I only have it on a DVD and a half baked version on YouTube. Let us see if better versions show up on YouTube one day, or I might find a way to use it from the DVD, or record it myself.

A Bayamo y el barco

I only have it on a DVD. Advanced move. Let us see if it shows up on YouTube one day, or I might find a way to use it from the DVD, or record it myself.

A Bayamo a la Habana

I only have it on a DVD. Advanced move. Let us see if it shows up on YouTube one day, or I might find a way to use it from the DVD, or record it myself.

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