Cuban Salsa: Setenta Nuevo

Setenta Nuevo is a typical Complicado in the Setenta family at advanced level, and the move is not that easy to get going in social dancing unless both Lead and Follow are up to the task. The main problem is that when coming out of the Hammerlock and the Lead’s hook turn, Lead and Follow are sometimes as tight as an embrace, depending on body sizes and arm lengths, with little room for maneuvering and arm movements.

The move is popular judging from the many videos on YouTube, and I use it a lot when dancing with the best Follows. Even if a good Follow doesn’t know the move, the Lead has no problems leading it, if he is used to do it, but the move is likely to go wrong from time to time until the Lead really has it and is able to judge if the Follow is good enough to be served the move.

Since we are at advanced level, it is very common for the Lead to use Alarde to himself in the initial Hammerlock part but that is just an optional feature. All the videos of Setenta Nuevo, I have found, show the same move except for the ending that varies a lot. Most often we see a two handed Enchufla at the end, followed by a hook turn, or the Lead wraps his right arm over the Follow like a blanket, or the Lead just gives the Follow a two handed Alarde, using both her hands. The most simple version uses a one handed Enchufla at the end and positioning steps.

1 Lead’s hook turn at the end

This is my favorite version, and makes Setenta Nuevo easy to remember as the Setenta with two hook turns. Video 1 is from “Son De Habana”, Bogotá, Colombia 2015, featuring Alexander Barreto and Susane Osorio:

Same Video on YouTube

2 Lead wraps his right arm over the Follow

This is probably the most common version, and easier than the hook turn at the end. Video 2 is from “SalsaFuerte”, Hungary, 2007. Note the Lead’s Alarde to himself at the end of the Hammerlock:

Same Video on YouTube

3 Three handed Alarde to the Follow

Video 3 from “SalsaMoveParis”, France, 2014, shows a common way to give the Follow an Alarde at the end of the move. The Lead uses his right hand and both hands of the Follow (three hands). And in some variations only the Follow’s right hand is used. In the second half of the video they show a simple version of Setenta Nuevo just using a one handed Enchufle and positioning steps at the end.

Same Video on YouTube

4 Four handed Alarde to the Follow

Video 4 from “LatinGate Salsa School”, Israel, 2011, shows how Setena Nuevo can be used in Rueda de Casino, and in addition it has a nice four handed Alarde to the Follow at the end.

Same Video on YouTube

5 One handed Enchufla and positioning steps

Finally we are going to see the most simple of the endings one more time: just a one handed Enchufla and positioning steps. Video 5 from “SalsaAcademy”, France, 2016. In this example the Lead also gives himself an Alarde at the end of the Hammerlock:

Same Video on YouTube

6 Why so many endings?

I have met instructors insisting on doing the ending exactly their way. That is ridiculous! The endings are not even a case of personal preference only. All the endings can be useful depending on the situation.

I set out to use the two handed Enchufla and the Lead’s second hook turn at the very end as my personal preference. But since that is the most difficult of the endings, I might need to make adjustments in the situation.

I carefully measure how good I and this particular Follow is doing the first part of the move. If we are a little off balance, or in need of time, when coming out of the Complicado, or if it somehow feels more appropriate to the music, I decide for an easier ending.

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