Cuban Salsa: Setenta y Cinco Simple

As mentioned in the Setenta y Cinco (75) tutorial, the “75” with the two handed Vacilala at the end, there are many good alternative ways to end the move, making it easy to adapt to any Follow and to changes in the music. But nine out of 10 videos use the Vacilala ending.

In this tutorial we look at the most simple way to end the move. Instead of the Vacilala after the Dile Que No, we just end the move with the Dile Que No. Another good option is to transform the last part of Dile Que No to a left turn or a Coca Cola left turn. We show the last option first because of the quality of the video.

Dile Que No with left turn

Video 1 is an excellent educational dance video from “Dance Papi”, San Francisco Bay Area, USA, 2015, featuring Nicholas Van Eyck and Serena Wong as instructors. Support Dancepapi.com, they have many good educational videos. Note that they don’t use Vacilala steps for the Hammerlock but just a right turn. They use a loose left turn on 6-7, at the end, but we can also use a more tight Coca Cola left turn depending on what we want to do next.

Same Video on YouTube

Both the video above and the next video are named Setenta y Uno (71). But that name should be reserved for the first part of the move ending with the Gancho. It is important that we have a basic “71” as building block that can be used as the start of many moves.

Just the Dile Que No

Video 2 is from Christina Espejo, 2008, showing the most simple Setena y Cinco. This is not just for beginners, but a good way to start learning the longer versions. It can also be the preferred choice of advanced dancers in some situations, if it feels more natural to use because of some changes in the music.

Same Video on YouTube

Simple versions of moves are also handy to use, as a brake if a move is not developing as planned. If Lead or Follow for some reason is off balance, could be because of a “bump” from other dancers, or if the dance floor suddenly gets too crowded in front of you, it might be desirable to skip the two handed Vacilala.

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